Volume 30 Issue 4
Jul.  2020
Turn off MathJax
Article Contents

WANG Rui, DONG Zhibao, ZHOU Zhengchao. Different Responses of Vegetation to Frozen Ground Degradation in the Source Region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2018[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2020, 30(4): 557-571. doi: 10.1007/s11769-020-1135-y
Citation: WANG Rui, DONG Zhibao, ZHOU Zhengchao. Different Responses of Vegetation to Frozen Ground Degradation in the Source Region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2018[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2020, 30(4): 557-571. doi: 10.1007/s11769-020-1135-y

Different Responses of Vegetation to Frozen Ground Degradation in the Source Region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2018

doi: 10.1007/s11769-020-1135-y
Funds:

Under the auspices of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41807061, 41930641, 41977061), Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (No. 2018M633454), Team Building Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. GK202001003)

  • Received Date: 2019-08-14
  • Frozen ground degradation under a warming climate profoundly influences the growth of alpine vegetation in the source region of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. This study investigated spatiotemporal variations in the frozen ground distribution, the active layer thickness (ALT) of permafrost (PF) soil and the soil freeze depth (SFD) in seasonally frozen soil from 1980 to 2018 using the temperature at the top of permafrost (TTOP) model and Stefan equation. We compared the effects of these variations on vegetation growth among different frozen ground types and vegetation types in the source region of the Yellow River (SRYR). The results showed that approximately half of the PF area (20.37% of the SRYR) was projected to degrade into seasonally frozen ground (SFG) during the past four decades; furthermore, the areal average ALT increased by 3.47 cm/yr, and the areal average SFD decreased by 0.93 cm/yr from 1980 to 2018. Accordingly, the growing season Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) presented an increasing trend of 0.002/10yr, and the increase rate and proportion of areas with NDVI increase were largest in the transition zone where PF degraded to SFG (the PF to SFG zone). A correlation analysis indicated that variations in ALT and SFD in the SRYR were significantly correlated with increases of NDVI in the growing season. However, a rapid decrease in SFD (< -1.4 cm/10yr) could have reduced the soil moisture and, thus, decreased the NDVI. The NDVI for most vegetation types exhibited a significant positive correlation with ALT and a negative correlation with SFD. However, the steppe NDVI exhibited a significant negative correlation with the SFD in the PF to SFG zone but a positive correlation in the SFG zone, which was mainly limited by water condition because of different change rates of the SFD.
  • [1] Anderson J E, Douglas T A, Barbato R A et al., 2019. Linking vegetation cover and seasonal thaw depths in interior Alaska permafrost terrains using remote sensing. Remote Sensing of Environment, 233:111363. doi: 10.1016/j.rse.2019.111363
    [2] Barry R G, Gan T Y, 2011. The Global Cryosphere:Past, Present and Future. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.
    [3] Cable J M, Ogle K, Bolton W R et al., 2014. Permafrost thaw affects boreal deciduous plant transpiration through increased soil water, deeper thaw, and warmer soils. Ecohydrology, 7(3):982-997. doi: 10.1002/eco.1423
    [4] Cuo L, Zhang Y X, Bohn T J et al., 2015. Frozen soil degradation and its effects on surface hydrology in the northern Tibetan Plateau. Journal of Geophysical Research:Atmospheres, 120(16):8276-8298. doi: 10.1002/2015JD023193
    [5] Dente L, Vekerdy Z, Wen J et al., 2012. Maqu network for valida-tion of satellite-derived soil moisture products. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 17:55-65. doi: 10.1016/j.jag.2011.11.004
    [6] Du Jiaqiang, Shu Jianmin, Wang Yurhui et al., 2014. Comparison of GIMMS and MODIS normalized vegetation index compo-site data for Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Chinese Journal of Applied Ecology, 25(2):533-544. (in Chinese)
    [7] Evans S G, Ge S M, 2017. Contrasting hydrogeologic responses to warming in permafrost and seasonally frozen ground hillslopes. Geophysical Research Letters, 44(4):1803-1813. doi: 10.1002/2016GL072009
    [8] Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), World Soil Information, Institute of Soil Science (ISRIC), Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (JRC), 2009. Harmonized World Soil Database (Version 1.1). Available at:http://www.fao.org/land-water/databases-and-software/hwsd/en/
    [9] Feng Y Q, Liang S H, Kuang X X et al., 2019. Effect of climate and thaw depth on alpine vegetation variations at different permafrost degrading stages in the Tibetan Plateau, China. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 51(1):155-172. doi: 10.1080/15230430.2019.1605798
    [10] Frauenfeld O W, Zhang T J, 2011. An observational 71-year his-tory of seasonally frozen ground changes in the Eurasian high latitudes. Environmental Research Letters, 6(4):044024. doi: 10.1088/1748-9326/6/4/044024
    [11] Ganjurjav H, Gao Q Z, Gornish E S et al., 2016. Differential re-sponse of alpine steppe and alpine meadow to climate warming in the central Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Agricultural and forest Meteorology, 223:233-240. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet. 2016.03.017
    [12] Gao B, Yang D W, Qin Y et al., 2018. Change in frozen soils and its effect on regional hydrology, upper Heihe basin, northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The Cryosphere, 12(2):657-673. doi: 10.5194/tc-12-657-2018
    [13] Gu L L, Yao J M, Hu Z Y et al., 2015. Comparison of the surface energy budget between regions of seasonally frozen ground and permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau. Atmospheric Research, 153:553-564. doi: 10.1016/j.atmosres.2014.10.012
    [14] Guo D L, Wang H J, 2013. Simulation of permafrost and season-ally frozen ground conditions on the Tibetan Plateau, 1981-2010. Journal of Geophysical Research:Atmospheres, 118(11):5216-5230. doi: 10.1002/jgrd.50457
    [15] Guo J T, Hu Y M, Xiong Z P et al., 2017. Variations in grow-ing-season NDVI and its response to permafrost degradation in Northeast China. Sustainability, 9(4):551. doi: 10.3390/su9040551
    [16] Guo Q, Hu Z M, Li S G et al., 2015. Contrasting responses of gross primary productivity to precipitation events in a wa-ter-limited and a temperature-limited grassland ecosystem. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 214-215:169-177. doi: 10.1016/j.agrformet.2015.08.251
    [17] Hou Xueyu, 2001. Vegetation Atlas of China (1:1000000). Bei-jing:Science Press. (in Chinese)
    [18] Hu M Q, Mao F, Sun H et al., 2011. Study of normalized differ-ence vegetation index variation and its correlation with climate factors in the Three-River-Source region. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 13(1):24-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jag.2010.06.003
    [19] Iijima Y, Ohta T, Kotani A et al., 2014. Sap flow changes in relation to permafrost degradation under increasing precipitation in an eastern Siberian larch forest. Ecohydrology, 7(2):117-187. doi: 10.1002/eco.1366
    [20] Jin H J, He R X, Cheng G D et al., 2009. Changes in frozen ground in the Source Area of the Yellow River on the Qing-hai-Tibet Plateau, China, and their eco-environmental impacts. Environmental Research Letters, 4(4):045206. doi: 10.1088/1748-9326/4/4/045206
    [21] Klanderud K, 2008. Species-specific responses of an alpine plant community under simulated environmental change. Journal of Vegetation Science, 19(3):363-372. doi: 10.3170/2008-8-18376
    [22] Lawrence D M, Slater A G, Swenson S C, 2012. Simulation of present-day and future permafrost and seasonally frozen ground conditions in CCSM4. Journal of Climate, 25(7):2207-2225. doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00334.1
    [23] Luo D L, Jin H J, Marchenko S et al., 2014. Distribution and changes of active layer thickness (ALT) and soil temperature (TTOP) in the source area of the Yellow River using the GIPL model. Science China Earth Sciences, 57(8):1834-1845. doi: 10.1007/s11430-014-4852-1
    [24] Miranda V, Pina P, Heleno S et al., 2020. Monitoring recent changes of vegetation in Fildes Peninsula (King George Island, Antarctica) through satellite imagery guided by UAV surveys. Science of the Total Environment, 704:135295. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.135295
    [25] Mowll W, Blumenthal D M, Cherwin K et al., 2015. Climatic controls of aboveground net primary production in semi-arid grasslands along a latitudinal gradient portend low sensitivity to warming. Oecologia, 177(4):959-969. doi: 10.1007/s00442-015-3232-7
    [26] Mu C C, Li L L, Zhang F et al., 2018. Impacts of permafrost on above-and belowground biomass on the northern Qing-hai-Tibetan Plateau. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 50(1):e1447192. doi: 10.1080/15230430.2018.1447192
    [27] Oliva M, Pereira P, Antoniades D, 2018. The environmental con-sequences of permafrost degradation in a changing climate. Science of the Total Environment, 616-617:435-437. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.10.285
    [28] Pan F F, Peters-Lidard C D, Sale M J, 2003. An analytical method for predicting surface soil moisture from rainfall observations. Water Resources Research, 2003, 39(11):1314. doi: 10.1029/2003wr002142
    [29] Qin Dahe, Stocker T, 2014. Highlights of the IPCC working group I fifth assessment report. Progressus Inquisitiones de Mutatione Climatis, 10(1):1-6. (in Chinese)
    [30] Qin Y, Yang D W, Gao B et al., 2017. Impacts of climate warming on the frozen ground and eco-hydrology in the Yellow River source region, China. Science of the Total Environment, 605-606:830-841. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.06.188
    [31] Ran Y H, Li X, Lu L et al., 2012. Large-scale land cover mapping with the integration of multi-source information based on the dempster-shafer theory. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 26(1):169-191. doi:10.1080/13658816. 2011.577745
    [32] Rode M, Schnepfleitner H, Sass O, 2016. Simulation of moisture content in alpine rockwalls during freeze-thaw events. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 41(13):1937-1950. doi: 10.1002/esp.3961
    [33] Scott R L, Hamerlynck E P, Jenerette G D et al., 2010. Carbon dioxide exchange in a semidesert grassland through drought-induced vegetation change. Journal of Geophysical Research:Biogeosciences, 115(G3):G03026. doi: 10.1029/2010JG001348
    [34] Shen X J, An R, Feng L et al., 2018. Vegetation changes in the Three-River Headwaters Region of the Tibetan Plateau of China. Ecological Indicators, 93:804-812. doi: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.05.065
    [35] Smith M W, Riseborough D W, 1996. Permafrost monitoring and detection of climate change. Permafrost and Periglacial Pro-cesses, 7(4):301-309. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-1530(199610) 7:4<301:AID-PPP231>3.0.CO;2-R
    [36] Stow D, Daeschner S, Hope A et al., 2003. Variability of the sea-sonally integrated normalized difference vegetation index across the north slope of Alaska in the 1990s. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 24(5):1111-1117. doi: 10.1080/0143116021000020144
    [37] Walker M D, Wahren C H, Hollister R D et al, 2006. Plant com-munity responses to experimental warming across the tundra biome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(5):1342-1346. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0503198103
    [38] Wang Q F, Zhang T J, Jin H J et al., 2017a. Observational study on the active layer freeze-thaw cycle in the upper reaches of the Heihe River of the north-eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Quaternary international zhengti, 440:13-22. doi:10.1016/j.quaint. 2016.08.027
    [39] Wang R, Dong Z B, Zhou Z C, 2019a. Changes in the depths of seasonal freezing and thawing and their effects on vegetation in the Three-River Headwater Region of the Tibetan Plateau. Journal of Mountain Science, 16(12):2810-2827. doi:10. 1007/s11629-019-5450-7.
    [40] Wang R, Dong Z B, Zhou Z C, 2020. Effect of decreasing soil frozen depth on vegetation growth in the source region of the Yellow River. Theoretical and Applied Climatology. doi:10.1007/s00704-020-03141-3 (in press)
    [41] Wang R, Zhu Q K, Ma H et al., 2017b. Spatial-temporal variations in near-surface soil freeze-thaw cycles in the source region of the Yellow River during the period 2002-2011 based on the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) data. Journal of Arid Land, 9(6):850-864. doi: 10.1007/s40333-017-0032-4
    [42] Wang R, Zhu Q K, Ma H, 2019b. Changes in freezing and thawing indices over the source region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2014. Journal of Forestry Research, 30(1):257-268. doi: 10.1007/s11676-017-0589-y
    [43] Wang T H, Yang D W, Qin Y et al., 2018a. Historical and future changes of frozen ground in the upper Yellow River Basin. Global and Planetary Change, 162:199-211. doi: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.01.009
    [44] Wang T Y, Wu T H, Wang P et al., 2019c. Spatial distribution and changes of permafrost on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau revealed by statistical models during the period of 1980 to 2010. Science of the Total Environment, 650:661-670. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.398
    [45] Wang X Y, Yi S H, Wu Q B et al., 2016. The role of permafrost and soil water in distribution of alpine grassland and its NDVI dynamics on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Global and Planetary Change, 147:40-53. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016. 10.014
    [46] Wang Y H, Yang H B, Gao B et al., 2018b. Frozen ground degra-dation may reduce future runoff in the headwaters of an inland river on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Journal of Hydrology, 564:1153-1164. doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.07.078
    [47] Wang Z R, Yang G J, Yi S H et al., 2012. Different response of vegetation to permafrost change in semi-arid and semi-humid regions in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Environmental Earth Sci-ences, 66(3):985-991. doi: 10.1007/s12665-011-1405-1
    [48] Woo M K, 2012. Permafrost Hydrology. Heidelberg:Springer.
    [49] Wu Q B, Hou Y D, Yun H B et al., 2015. Changes in active-layer thickness and near-surface permafrost between 2002 and 2012 in alpine ecosystems, Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau, China. Global and Planetary Change, 124:149-155. doi: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2014.09.002
    [50] Xu W X, Gu S, Zhao X Q et al., 2011. High positive correlation between soil temperature and NDVI from 1982 to 2006 in al-pine meadow of the Three-River Source Region on the Qing-hai-Tibetan Plateau. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 13(4):528-535. doi: 10.1016/j.jag.2011.02.001
    [51] Yang M X, Wang X J, Pang G J et al., 2019. The Tibetan Plateau cryosphere:Observations and model simulations for current status and recent changes. Earth Science Reviews, 190:353-369. doi: 10.1016/j.earscirev.2018.12.018
    [52] Yang M X, Wang X J, Pang G J et al., 2019. The Tibetan Plateau cryosphere:observations and model simulations for current status and recent changes. Earth-Science Reviews, 190:353-369. doi: 10.1016/j.earscirev.2018.12.018
    [53] Yang Z H, Still B, Ge X X, 2015. Mechanical properties of sea-sonally frozen and permafrost soils at high strain rate. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 113:12-19. doi: 10.1016/j.coldregions.2015.02.008
    [54] Yang Z P, Gao J X, Zhao L et al., 2013. Linking thaw depth with soil moisture and plant community composition:effects of permafrost degradation on alpine ecosystems on the Qing-hai-Tibet Plateau. Plant and Soil, 367(1-2):687-700. doi: 10.1007/s11104-012-1511-1
    [55] Yao Tandong, Qin Dahe, Shen Yongping et al., 2013. Cryospheric changes and their impacts on regional water cycle and ecological conditions in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Chinese Journal of Nature, 35(3):179-186. (in Chinese)
    [56] Yi S H, Zhou Z Y, Ren S L et al., 2011. Effects of permafrost degradation on alpine grassland in a semi-arid basin on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Environmental Research Letters, 6(4):45403. doi: 10.1088/1748-9326/6/4/045403
    [57] Zhang T, Wang G X, Yang Y et al., 2017. Grassland types and season-dependent response of ecosystem respiration to ex-perimental warming in a permafrost region in the Tibetan Plateau. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 247:271-279. doi: 10.1016/j.agrformet.2017.08.010
    [58] Zorigt M, Kwadijk J, Van Beek E et al., 2016. Estimating thawing depths and mean annual ground temperatures in the Khuvsgul region of Mongolia. Environmental Earth Sciences, 75(10):897. doi: 10.1007/s12665-016-5687-1
  • 加载中
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Article Metrics

Article views(142) PDF downloads(8) Cited by()

Proportional views
Related

Different Responses of Vegetation to Frozen Ground Degradation in the Source Region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2018

doi: 10.1007/s11769-020-1135-y
Funds:

Under the auspices of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41807061, 41930641, 41977061), Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (No. 2018M633454), Team Building Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. GK202001003)

Abstract: Frozen ground degradation under a warming climate profoundly influences the growth of alpine vegetation in the source region of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. This study investigated spatiotemporal variations in the frozen ground distribution, the active layer thickness (ALT) of permafrost (PF) soil and the soil freeze depth (SFD) in seasonally frozen soil from 1980 to 2018 using the temperature at the top of permafrost (TTOP) model and Stefan equation. We compared the effects of these variations on vegetation growth among different frozen ground types and vegetation types in the source region of the Yellow River (SRYR). The results showed that approximately half of the PF area (20.37% of the SRYR) was projected to degrade into seasonally frozen ground (SFG) during the past four decades; furthermore, the areal average ALT increased by 3.47 cm/yr, and the areal average SFD decreased by 0.93 cm/yr from 1980 to 2018. Accordingly, the growing season Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) presented an increasing trend of 0.002/10yr, and the increase rate and proportion of areas with NDVI increase were largest in the transition zone where PF degraded to SFG (the PF to SFG zone). A correlation analysis indicated that variations in ALT and SFD in the SRYR were significantly correlated with increases of NDVI in the growing season. However, a rapid decrease in SFD (< -1.4 cm/10yr) could have reduced the soil moisture and, thus, decreased the NDVI. The NDVI for most vegetation types exhibited a significant positive correlation with ALT and a negative correlation with SFD. However, the steppe NDVI exhibited a significant negative correlation with the SFD in the PF to SFG zone but a positive correlation in the SFG zone, which was mainly limited by water condition because of different change rates of the SFD.

WANG Rui, DONG Zhibao, ZHOU Zhengchao. Different Responses of Vegetation to Frozen Ground Degradation in the Source Region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2018[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2020, 30(4): 557-571. doi: 10.1007/s11769-020-1135-y
Citation: WANG Rui, DONG Zhibao, ZHOU Zhengchao. Different Responses of Vegetation to Frozen Ground Degradation in the Source Region of the Yellow River from 1980 to 2018[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2020, 30(4): 557-571. doi: 10.1007/s11769-020-1135-y
Reference (58)

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return